All posts by Philip Regan

Ars Technica: Nintendo president hints at exploring smartphone gaming support

“We are thinking about a new business structure,” Iwata told the press, according to a Bloomberg News report. “Given the expansion of smart devices, we are naturally studying how smart devices can be used to grow the game-player business. It’s not as simple as enabling Mario to move on a smartphone.”

“We cannot continue a business without winning,” he continued. “We must take a skeptical approach [to] whether we can still simply make game players, offer them in the same way as in the past for 20,000 yen or 30,000 yen, and sell titles for a couple of thousand yen each.”
Ars Technica: Nintendo president hints at exploring smartphone gaming support

I’m willing to bet dollars to donuts that Nintendo has some skunkworks deep in the heart of headquarters where Mario, Zelda, and their colleagues are running freely on iOS and Android, if not also on desktops, waiting and figuring out the best way to roll it out. This would be just like the rumor I had read ages ago that Apple has most incarnations of Mac OS running on Intel chips the entire time they were manufacturing with PowerPC chips. To see the benefit of doing so is not hard.

If Zelda came to iOS I would snap that up in a second. My Wii has barely been touched since I started school, there have been three new consoles since I started, and I still have a long way to go. I really hope they are moving in this direction, though I can also understand the hesitancy of handing over 30% of revenue to Apple.

What Orwell feared were those who would ban books. What Huxley feared was that there would be no reason to ban a book, for there would be no one who wanted to read one. Orwell feared those who would deprive us of information. Huxley feared those who would give us so much that we would be reduced to passivity and egoism. Orwell feared that the truth would be concealed from us. Huxley feared the truth would be drowned in a sea of irrelevance. Orwell feared we would become a captive culture. Huxley feared we would become a trivial culture, preoccupied with some equivalent of the feelies, the orgy porgy, and the centrifugal bumble puppy.
onthepathofknowledge.wordpress.com: Amusing ourselves to death

Two of my favorite books together in one. It’s like a literary peanut butter cup. I haven’t read this book, but I am going to add it to my list based on this quote alone.

Studies in Semicolons: The Parable of the Carpenter

The carpenter understands the value of something he works with every day, and that’s why he spends so much money on the hammer. But he also understands that value is a double-edged sword: he’s committing to the product he knows, that is reliable.
Studies in Semicolons: The Parable of the Carpenter

Replacing the subject of the punchline with other tools in which I have invested makes this parable applicable to more areas than I care to think about. Interestingly enough, Microsoft Office is not one of them.

Thanks, HP, for reminding me why I have gone paperless.

I would like to thank Hewlett-Packard and their LaserJet line of printers, particularly the M1217nfw, for reminding me why I have gone all but entirely paperless, leaving what little paper I utilize left as not being generated by myself.

I am not stupid but troubleshooting anything on this pile of plastic crap makes me feel that way. Trying to get their printer to work with Mac OS 10.9 Mavericks has been a pointless exercise in petty frustration. This used to be easy: download a zip file, unzip, install, plug in the printer, and boom! Printing. Instead, they wholly rely on Apple to distribute drivers—there is no direct link to an archive to be found anywhere; the printer’s internal webpage does a spectacular job confounding even the most advanced of browsers; none of the instructions on their support page actually matches reality. It’s almost as if the people writing the software, those writing the documentation, and those building the support pages don’t actually talk to each other. Nothing has ever worked as advertised with this printer. The only computer I can get to talk to this printer is a six year old MacBook, and that’s when it is plugged in via USB. I am better off having all my documents on my phone or tablet at this point. What a waste of money. Forget going paperless to be green; I’ll just go paperless out of spite.

UPDATE: After looking into this further, part of my problem appears to be that in trying to acquire the software for my work laptop I see that my company’s IT department redirects (nay, hijacks) the Software Update URL to an internal server. But this redirect is known to be buggy in Mavericks so the URL fails (in fact the address cannot be resolved at all so something else is going on. A support ticket has been submitted). I’m still trying to sort out how to get around this and just go direct to Apple, though it would appear that despite my resetting the URL in defaults, I will need to go to my IT department for a fix. But I don’t blame my IT department. My angst is still pointed to HP for not giving links to their drivers and instead simply telling people to go to Apple. Not giving people a back up plan is lame.

All I want to do is print two (2!) lousy pieces of paper, and here is one hell of a mess trying to do just that.

Led Zepplin on Spotify

So, Zepplin is on Spotify now. I love my Spotify account, and it is bands like this that are a big part of the reason why I have an account. I bought all of Led Zepplin’s albums on cassette I can’t tell you how many years ago, but I never deigned to migrate all of that cassette collection to CD when those releases came out. Spotify has been great for me to catch up on a bunch of bands that I have not listened to in decades (ouch, but I suppose it really has been that long) without having to outright buy albums like I would with iTunes. I and II are both downloaded and ready for the morning commute tomorrow. Looking forward to reveling in these again.

That…

That first cup of coffee brewed from a french press that is fresh out of the dishwasher. Bad coffee is bad coffee, but a completely clean press can turn an okay grind into a surprisingly good one.

That wonderful diminishing effect holiday weeks have on the traffic in which I almost inevitably find myself along my fifty-mile commute. I actually have time to post something this morning.

That mix of both hope and dread at the remaining weeks of a semester when almost of the final assignments have been released, and the true scope work needed to be done in the next (less than) four weeks has been revealed.

That sense of calm that comes from finding out that others are in the exact same situation in their own words.