Tag Archives: personal

The Chocolate Season

A former co-worker of mine used to call the time between Halloween and Easter “The Chocolate Season.” I have no idea where she got it from, but the label does immediately make sense when I think about it. In my world, Halloween, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Valentine’s Day, and Easter all line up in a relentless parade of sweets. Obviously, there is more than just chocolate involved here, but chocolate does provide a handy culinary benchmark with which to characterize these holidays. So, I go with it. It’s an easy joke in conversation.

I am not a health fanatic by any stretch, but I make a point of actively deciding from where my indulgent calories will be delivered, which generally boils down to either sugar or alcohol. If I have one in a given day, or know I will be having one at some point in the day, I won’t have the other. Neither are good for my girlish figure, but they are good for the soul. I see nothing wrong with enjoying either, just never at the same time and always in moderation. I derive relatively more satisfaction from alcohol—insert ill-fitted and inappropriate alcoholism joke here—so my junk food intake is pretty minimal.

Because of this active caloric decision-making, I can walk away from a cookie tray or dessert platter without thinking. But I see one fucking Reese’s Peanut Butter Cup and all of a sudden I get that nicotine “itch” in the back of my brain that causes me to obsess like the little sugar fiend that I know myself to truly be. My paradoxical strength and weakness is, and always has been, peanut butter. Peanut butter is versatile, good for a quick lunch that fills me up but amazing when combined with chocolate. Seriously, I have yet to come across a peanut butter cup that I didn’t like. The problem that has revealed itself is that Reese’s has done an absolutely fantastic job at embedding itself in Halloween and Easter, and I fear that the remaining holidays aren’t too far behind. Though I think Valentine’s Day will be a tough one for Hershey’s if only because there is little romance in anything other than just pure chocolate. Either way, Halloween kicks off six months of testing my will power. As my wife is fond of saying: “Ugh.”

EFF: Adobe Spyware Reveals (Again) the Price of DRM: Your Privacy and Security

The publishing world may finally be facing its “rootkit scandal.” Two independent reports claim that Adobe’s e-book software, “Digital Editions,” logs every document readers add to their local “library,” tracks what happens with those files, and then sends those logs back to the mother-ship, over the Internet, in the clear. In other words, Adobe is not only tracking your reading habits, it’s making it really, really easy for others to do so as well.
EFF: Adobe Spyware Reveals (Again) the Price of DRM: Your Privacy and Security

Adobe collects information about whatever book you happen to be reading using Adobe Digital Editions, which potentially means your entire ADE collection. Then ADE sends that information back to Adobe in the clear, meaning anyone snooping can read it.

Intentional or not, I find none of this surprising.

Be careful what you ask for because you are going to get it.

This video has been making the rounds, so I thought I would take a shot at it…

I’m not really sure where to begin with this, so here’s everything that immediately came to mind upon watching this. All of this would apply to any smartphone, not just Apple’s. Choose what you like…

  1. I find your use of the phrase “for Science” offensive.
  2. Learn to take care of your shit. None of what you have done, or are ostensibly simulating, is a good idea. I don’t believe for even one second that placing the phone in your front pocket would require it experiencing this amount of pressure. Put it in your back pocket where it could experience this amount of pressure, however, and…well…you get everything you deserve by doing so. So, learn to take care of your shit.
  3. In other news, twentysomethings learn that shit is expensive when you have to pay for it yourself. Film at 11.
  4. Can we go back to complaining about battery life and antenna performance? Because this video is a waste of everyone’s time.
  5. Be careful what you ask for because you are going to get it.

The economics of a web-based book: year one

Let’s face it, un­less you’re re­ally slow on the up­take, you’ve out­fit­ted your web browser with an ad blocker. Ha ha, you win! But wait—that means most web ads are only reach­ing those who are re­ally slow on the up­take. So their dol­lars are dis­pro­por­tion­ately im­por­tant in sup­port­ing the con­tent you’re get­ting ad-free. “Not my prob­lem,” you say. Oh re­ally? Since those peo­ple are the only ones fi­nan­cially sup­port­ing the con­tent, pub­lish­ers in­creas­ingly are shap­ing their sto­ries to ap­peal to them. Even­tu­ally, the con­tent you liked—well, didn’t like it enough to pay for it—will be gone.

Why? Be­cause you starved it to death. The im­mutable law re­mains: you can’t get some­thing for noth­ing. The web has been able to de­fer the con­se­quences of this prin­ci­ple by shift­ing the costs of con­tent off read­ers and onto ad­ver­tis­ers. But if read­ers per­ma­nently with­draw as eco­nomic par­tic­i­pants in the writ­ing in­dus­try—i.e., refuse to vote with their wal­lets—then they’ll have no rea­son to protest as the uni­verse of good writ­ing shrinks. (And make no mis­take—it’s al­ready happening.)
The economics of a web-based book: year one

Either I’m slow on the uptake or I’m just really good at ignoring advertising, because I don’t have an ad blocker in my browser. I have long since disabled Flash, however, but that was more because it was a needless drain on my processor and battery than anything. But, this is an interesting way of thinking about the issue of blocking the ads of ad-supported endeavors. Be careful what you ask for (block ads supporting the content you find useful) because you are going to get it (crappy content because people who can value their time monetarily aren’t going to write content that won’t pay).

Watching Television Is Still Not Easy

I took another stab at watching MasterChef last night despite my final smug “259 day” comment from yesterday, and I actually got to see at least the first half (I fell asleep before the second half began, but that’s another story). This time, it was Verizon getting in my way rather then Fox.

For those unfamiliar, Verizon’s OnDemand organizes television shows in a myriad different ways—by network, show title, HD vs. standard definition—and there are sometimes multiple ways to get to the same episode. It also appears as though that making mistakes is easy for whomever’s job it is to upload new content to OnDemand.

To get to Masterchef, the path I typically go is Free & Premium > TV > By Network > Fox HD > Masterchef. But, the latest HD versions of the show are no longer listed here; there is now that n-day delay that Fox so explains on their own website. Things went wonky this season because there are two listings for MasterChef: “Masterchef” and “Master Chef”. There is little difference between the two except that one has the pre-season extras and the other does not. Neither of them contain the episode that just aired.

Last night, I took another stab at watching the show, but this time instead of going the Fox HD path, I went the plain Fox path. Again, there are two listings for MasterChef as in the HD menu. One has the standard definition shows, which I never watch because I paid good money for my HD TV and I’ll be damned if I am going to waste both my time and money watching anything standard definition, and the other contains the HD shows including the latest one. Bingo, but what a slog to get there. The cherry on top of this sundae is that in trying to figure which episode to watch, I started watching the second half of the episode that spoiled the ending of the first half.

Watching TV now appears to have at least two extreme paths. First is the one that has always existed where one sits down for the original broadcast at a specific day, time, and network, which is undeniably easy. The other is the path that exists for those that cannot, or will not, make that kind of commitment in their schedule for a TV show, a path that is fraught with seemingly pointless barriers to viewing.

I don’t understand this delay they have in place. No matter where I watch the show, I’m still seeing advertising before and during my viewing, which I am totally fine with. But the advertising obfuscates the purpose that delay serves. As such, I have a hard time listening to the entertainment industry complain about poor revenue and rampant piracy when they themselves establish all these seemingly arbitrary barriers to viewing. Clearly, what they are doing isn’t working and despite being in media and publishing myself I have little sympathy for them on this.

Remember when watching TV was easy?

I don’t watch a lot of television or movies. Between my nightly efforts towards a bachelor’s degree, my full-time day job, and two kids, I simply don’t have the time to watch a lot of television. The only time I have for TV and movies is during the summer, and even then the habit has been mostly broken. Still, when it’s late in the evening after the kids have gone to bed, I don’t mind an hour or two on the weekends.

One show I watch during the summer is MasterChef. I know, right? But by the time I get to a point where I have an hour to just sit, I’m not terribly keen on engaging deeply with anything. That’s about all the justification I have and all that’s really needed. I don’t waste my time much anywhere else (except maybe here), so I don’t feel I’m committing any great sins watching people cook, eat, and critique food.

Now that the semester has started again, I can’t watch the show at the time of broadcast because I have class on Monday nights. Also, I can’t watch the show on OnDemand like I used to because Fox made a change in policy recently as to when the latest show is released to OnDemand and Hulu by delaying the latest episode’s release by a day. Last night (a Tuesday) happened to be a good time to catch up on Monday’s show—I had a small window in between assignments—so I went to Fox’s website to catch up. I was confronted with this:

140910_01_fox

The text reads:

Why wait another day to watch the latest hit shows on FOX?

To watch your favorite FOX shows the next day after they air, just pop in your TV Provider’s Username and Password. It’s quick and easy with no delays. Don’t wait 8 days to keep up with the latest shows you love. Instead watch them in 24 hours – while they’re still the latest.
Next day access, sign in now.

Followed by a button, then this:

259 day delay, well, patience is a virtue.

I’ll leave the editorializing for later, for now here’s what happened: I clicked the button to enter my credentials, which then provided this listing of a slew of TV providers:

140910_02_cables

My “TV provider” is Verizon FiOS. I clicked their button and was presented with a link to either enter credentials at Verizon or “Get Temporary Access.”

140910_03_workaround

Given the opportunity to avoid entering credentials, I dove straight for the temporary access. I got into the show. I am presented with an ad, and then an episode that was 48 minutes long. But the preview for Monday’s show was a two-hour special, so something wasn’t right. I just happened to have two hours last night so I backed out of the show to go enter my credentials speculating, likely erroneously on my part, that entering my credentials would give me the whole show. Not sure why I thought that, it was late, but watching TV is so wonky these days for me these I don’t know what to expect.

My problem at that point is that I rarely ever go to Verizon’s website for anything—since I renewed my subscription things have been pretty much on cruise control—and I have long since misplaced my credentials. I think they’re on the file folder where I stash my paperwork in the cabinet upstairs, but I don’t remember and, in all honesty, I didn’t feel like getting up to go on the hunt. I took a couple stabs at the password, but after two (2!) attempts, I was locked out of my account. I was presented with the opportunity to reset my password. Resetting the password entails getting a text message with a temporary PIN. So, I pressed the requisite buttons.

Fifteen minutes of waiting and the temporary PIN still hadn’t come. By that time, any momentum I had for pursuing this is now gone. It was 21:30 and I have an 04:00 start the next day as I do every day. Clearly, I will have to properly manage my Verizon credentials situation this weekend when I have a bit more time, and I will have to work to carve out time this week or next to catch up on the latest, if I can.

Now I have some questions:

  • Why the “259 day delay?” What is that? Is that a scare tactic to get people to enter credentials? Do you want people to watch your TV and associated advertising or not, Fox?
  • Why does my “TV provider” have to enter into this exchange outside of providing pipes to a website?
  • Why is that if the credentials are technically required for easy access that temporary access is even offered? Requesting credentials at that point appears superfluous at best, and a waste of everyone’s time—Fox’s, the TV provider’s, the customer’s—at worst to get it all set up.

All I wanted to do was watch a particular TV show, that is what I had to go through, and I still wasn’t successful. This temporary PIN from Verizon never came as I write this the next morning. Perhaps all this makes me lazy or maybe I’m getting better at picking my battles. Either way, I’m glad to have been reminded that I’m not missing much, but I’ll try to check in again in roughly 259 days to see if anything has changed.

Someone is wrong on the internet.

I don’t know what compels me at times to dive back into email discussions about fussy things like iPhone vs. Android, at least fussy in the sense that most of us have no skin in the game outside of what we paid for our phones. But here I am on Hacker News getting my feet wet again…

> JohnTHaller 3 hours ago | link
>
> If you bought your music after Apple finally ditched DRM,
> you can upload your AAC files to Google Music for free and
> sync/stream them to all your Android devices as well as your
> laptops/desktops.
>
> If you “bought” your music with Apple DRM, you can pay
> another fee to actually own it and be able to play it on a
> non-Apple devices.
>
> If you “bought” your videos with Apple DRM, consider it a
> lesson learned.

1 point by oatmeal_coffee 28 minutes ago | link | edit |
delete

Taking the entire migration process you describe changes the
“price” to be paid for similar phone, so my claim of false
equivalence still stands.

There’s no “lesson” when I have made the conscious decision
to stick with Apple all these years. I may have paid a
premium paying for iPods and iPhones, but I feel my time is
valuable enough to not have to mess around with my media
files in any way you describe. Nor do I feel the urge to
spend money on music I have already purchased, but I don’t
see that as being a mistake from which to learn a lesson.
Nothing has happened to me with Apple or its products so
egregious to feel compelled to take on anything like you
describe.

I think what gets me sometimes is the general smugness that comes with these types of discussions and the inevitable finger-wagging that ensues. Discussions about mobile platforms, for me at least, have gone into that same category about religion, politics, and sports: Everyone has an opinion while sitting in their armchairs, and none of the opinions are going to sway anyone one way or another because no one is in the mood to listen. It’s bullshit, and I’m just as guilty as anyone else in the discussion. I don’t dive into these sorts of things nearly as much as I used to, but something about Hacker News has changed in the past several months where this kind of smug finger wagging is happening with greater frequency. Myself included. Still…

Don’t claim there is a lesson for me to learn in regards to my situation without knowing my story. I could just as likely have chosen to be in the position where I am. There is no lesson to be learned when I feel I have not done anything wrong. I know nothing about you, and you know nothing about me, so you are in no position to determine what is a lesson for me to learn.

The Unexotic Underclass

To your left are single mothers, 80% of whom, according to the US Census, are poor or hovering on the nasty edges of working poverty. They are struggling to raise their kids in a country that seems to conspire against any semblance of proper rearing: a lack of flexibility in the workplace; a lack of free or affordable after-school programs; an abysmal public education system where a testing-mad, criminally-deficient curriculum is taught during a too-short school day; an inescapable lurid wallpaper of sex and violence that covers every surface of society; a cultural disregard for intelligence, empathy and respect; a cultural imperative to look hot, spend money and own the latest “it”-device (or should I say i-device) no matter what it costs, no matter how little money Mum may have.

Slightly to the right, are your veterans of two ongoing wars in the Middle East. Wait, we’re at war? Some of these veterans, having served multiple tours, are returning from combat with all manner of monstrosities ravaging their heads and bodies. If that weren’t enough, welcome back, dear vets, to a flaccid economy, where your military training makes you invisible to an invisible hand that rewards only those of us who are young and expensively educated.
The Unexotic Underclass