Tag Archives: school

Apple hijacks Unix headers into Xcode in Mavericks

I am currently taking a class on Unix systems programming. While following along with lecture, the professor stated that almost always the header files needed for our type of work are located at /usr/include. However, that directory does not exist on my brand new Mavericks MacBook Pro. I have learned (after much searching the web) that the header files are now here:

/Applications/Xcode.app/Contents/Developer/Platforms/MacOSX.platform/Developer/SDKs/MacOSX10.9.sdk/usr

After doing some more research, I found that to get those Unix header files back into /usr/include, one has to install Xcode’s command line tools. But, in order to get those, one has to be a registered member on Apple’s developer website. Not necessarily a paying member, but registered.

I was once a paying member for Apple’s developer tools but I gave it up because I was not actually using everything that was made available. My focus changed and the annual $99 was going to waste. In fact, because of that and that Apple has so much of their Cocoa documentation available externally for free, my need to log into their website has decreased over time to my not touching it in over a year. Now I am jumping through the hoops to figure out which account I was using and what was the password, but that is turning out to be harder than expected for a variety of reasons on Apple’s side, the servers not propagating my Apple ID resets to the developer site being one of them. Yes, I should have done a better job of recording my information, but a simple password reset shouldn’t be this hard either. At this point, I will likely just create a new account solely for getting me what I need.

I have no idea when Apple hijacked the header files, and i can understand the logic and convenience of doing so for tool updates, but knowing what little I do about Unix, hijacking seems to be anathema to the Unix culture. Apple has made my morning nothing but hassle trying to get this fixed and I will have an assignment due soon. So, cheers for that, Apple.

UPDATE: I wound up creating an account solely for the developer account, and it was, as expected, faster and easier than mucking about with a bunch of password resets. Once I did that, getting the command line tools was not straightforward though not hard (Xcode > Open Developer Tool > More Developer Tools… which then kicks you over to a downloads page on the developer website, with registration required for access).

As for my comment about the new default header location being anathema to Unix, I realize now that’s not necessarily true. If anything, Apple can do whatever they want with their distro. But the fact remains based on everything I have read so far that there are some clear expectations about there things ought to be and the header file location is one of them. But at least now I can establish a workflow where I can use the muscle of Xcode to develop and then confidently test outside before submission.

The Federalist: The Death of Expertise

The death of expertise is a rejection not only of knowledge, but of the ways in which we gain knowledge and learn about things. Fundamentally, it’s a rejection of science and rationality, which are the foundations of Western civilization itself. Yes, I said “Western civilization”: that paternalistic, racist, ethnocentric approach to knowledge that created the nuclear bomb, the Edsel, and New Coke, but which also keeps diabetics alive, lands mammoth airliners in the dark, and writes documents like the Charter of the United Nations.
The Federalist: The Death of Expertise

About a year ago, I took a class that explored a number of issues related to this very topic, and I look forward to taking a similar class next year.

Bullet Journal: An analog note-taking system for the digital age

For the list-makers, the note-takers, the Post-It note pilots, the track-keepers, and the dabbling doodlers. Bullet journal is for those who feel there are few platforms as powerful as the blank paper page. It’s an analog system for the digital age that will help you organize the present, record the past, and plan for the future.
Bullet Journal: An analog note-taking system for the digital age.

via tomtunguz.com

I love this productivity stuff. I prefer digital tools these days—Toodledo has become a long-time favorite for work and school—so I got a bit overwhelmed with all the writing and re-writing when the system reached the monthly lists and indexing, though every aspect is a really good idea. I might actually have a use for all those Field Notes books sitting in my office for stuff around the house, which I don’t do in Toodledo for some reason.

The Atlantic: Which Colleges Should We Blame for the Student-Debt Crisis?

. . . for-profit colleges are the worst offenders in another respect: their alums are singularly incapable of paying back their loans. Despite educating just a small fraction of students, these institutions contributed a full 47 percent of defaults among students who began repaying their debt in 2009. By comparison, the private nonprofits, despite the truckloads of loans they generate, were only responsible for 13 percent of defaults. . . About three-quarters of for-profit college students attend nominally four-year schools. And I say “nominally,” because only about 28 percent ever graduate, about on par with the bottom rung of public institutions. They cater to a class of student that is disproportionately poor, and frankly don’t always belong in college to begin with.
The Atlantic: Which Colleges Should We Blame for the Student-Debt Crisis?

I remember when I was researching schools to obtain my degree, I looked at University of Phoenix first because of its focus on online classes (commute and kids makes attending on-campus classes very challenging), not knowing much about the school or the quality of the degree. I called to ask some cursory questions and quickly found myself in a conversation that sounded like I was being sold some land; the “admissions rep” wanted me to sign up right then and there, and just said “yep” to me on everything I asked. Before I even had a chance to research the school more on my own I was compelled to call back and turn them down because the rep was calling me at least once a day (sometimes three) to see if I had made my decision. If a school has to sell themselves that hard to get my tuition money, how good could it possibly be? I always—always—question the hard sell.